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ALICE AYCOCK

Alice Aycock, New York Studio, 2013. Photo by Kristine Larsen.
Alice Aycock's works can be found in numerous collections including the MoMA, the Whitney, Louis Vuitton Foundation, Storm King Art Center, Western Washington University, and the Sprengel Museum in Hanover, Germany. A traveling retrospective was organized by the Wurttembergischer Kunstverein in Stuttgart (1983) and a retrospective was held at Storm King (1990). MIT Press published the artist's first hardcover monograph in 2005, entitled Alice Aycock, Sculpture and Projects, authored by Robert Hobbs. In 2013, a retrospective of her drawings and small sculptures was exhibited at the Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill, New York coinciding with the Grey Art Gallery in New York City.

Her early works are land art pieces that involve reshaping the earth such as Low Building for Dirt Roof (1973/2010), collection of the Storm King Art Center, and A Simple Network of Underground Wells and Tunnels (1975/2012), permanently reconstructed at Omi International Arts Center, Ghent, NY. Clay #2, first executed in 1971, was reproduced for “Ends of the Earth: Art of the Land to 1974,” a comprehensive survey of the period held in 2012 at LAMOCA and traveling to Haus der Kunst, Munich.

She has major large-scale works throughout the country, including JFK Airport; San Francisco Public Library; East River Park Pavilion, NYC; the waterfront in Nashville, TN; and Dulles International Airport. A series of sculptures were installed on Park Avenue, entitled Park Avenue Paper Chase in 2014. Recent major installations include Coral Gables, FL, MGM National Harbor, MD, and a sculpture for the lobby of 50 West, New York, NY in July 2017. A permanent large-scale installation will be inaugurated at Pier 27, on the Toronto waterfront, in the fall of 2017, and a solo exhibition of her new sculptures will be exhibited at Marlborough Gallery, NY, in October 2017.



Reproduction, including downloading of Alice Aycock or Betye Saar's works is prohibited
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