International Sculpture Center

   


July/August 2013
Vol. 32 No 6

A publication of the
International Sculpture Center
Rome - William Kentridge: MAXXI
by Virginia Maksymowicz
Much has been written about Wil?liam Kentridge’s epic installation, The Refusal of Time, which was produced for Documenta XIII. After Kassel, the piece was reconfigured and moved to MAXXI, Rome’s still relatively new Museum of the Art of the 21st Century...see the entire review in the print version of July/August's Sculpture magazine.

William Kentridge, The Refusal of Time, 2012. 5-channel projections with megaphones and a “breathing machine” (“elephant”), installation view.
Los Angeles - Cheryl Ekstrom and JD Hansen: Leslie Sacks Fine Art
by Roberta Carasso
Blue McRight’s recent exhibition, “Quench,” featured a semi-installational aggregation of nearly 50 individual pieces. These objects emerge from a loosely linked set of concepts involving nature, personal experience, and environmental reality, following Deleuze and Guattari’s notion of “rhizomatic thinking.” As a result of how McRight hooks up, mutates, and disrupts her connections of images with concepts, her pieces become maps of transient ideas. The works consist of elements associated with plants, animals, and the circulation of water; their conceptual basis resides in the issue of water scarcity. One group of sculptures is made from tubes and hoses originally used for scuba diving or gardening...see the entire review in the print version of July/August's Sculpture magazine.

JD Hansen and Cheryl Ekstrom, Centaur, 2012. Bronze, 86 x 72 x 36 in.
Los Angeles - Blue McRight: Samuel Freeman Gallery
by Kathleen Whitney
Blue McRight’s recent exhibition, “Quench,” featured a semi-installational aggregation of nearly 50 individual pieces. These objects emerge from a loosely linked set of concepts involving nature, personal experience, and environmental reality, following Deleuze and Guattari’s notion of “rhizomatic thinking.” As a result of how McRight hooks up, mutates, and disrupts her connections of images with concepts, her pieces become maps of transient ideas. The works consist of elements associated with plants, animals, and the circulation of water; their conceptual basis resides in the issue of water scarcity. One group of sculptures is made from tubes and hoses originally used for scuba diving or gardening...see the entire review in the print version of July/August's Sculpture magazine.

Blue McRight, Well Wisher, 2012. Mixed media, 50 x 43 x 29 in.
Los Angeles - Jason Meadows: Marc Foxx
by George Melrod
Now hitting mid-career and mid-stride, Jason Meadows is a sculptor’s sculptor who often invokes the lexicon of 20th-century Modernism with his skilled choreography of volumes and materials while emphatically embracing a postmodern love of cultural pastiche. Never one to work on automatic, Meadows (one of the generation of L.A. sculptors who studied under Charles Ray at UCLA’s graduate program in the 1990s) spaces his shows several years apart; his recent exhibition featured three large sculptures and a wall-mounted piece. ...see the entire review in the print version of July/August's Sculpture magazine.


Jason Meadows, Justice League, 2011. Powder-coated aluminum, steel, and hardware, 103 x 78 x 74 in.
Washington, DC - Joan Danziger: Katzen Arts Center at American University
by Aneta Georgievska-Shine
The two-story atrium of the Katzen Arts Center, aggressively bisected by a large staircase that leads to the upper galleries, has always been a challenge for exhibiting painters and sculptors. Its robust architectural presence can make even the most daring artistic statement appear timid. Yet every once in a while, an artist manages to find an effective way of responding to its imposing sculptural volume and unpredictable angles: recent examples include Sam Gilliam’s draped pieces hung from the curved walls and ceiling (2011) and Emilie Brzezinski’s monumental wood sculptures, whose rough tree-like shapes appeared alive against the space’s stark planes (2012). ...see the entire review in the print version of July/August's Sculpture magazine.

Joan Danziger, installation view of “Inside the Underworld: Beetle Magic,” 2012.
Atlanta - Ruth Laxson: Museum of Contemporary Art of Georgia
by Lilly Lampe
An endless fascination with language defines Ruth Laxson’s work. She combines mathematical equations, musical annotation, graphic symbols, and text to create a unique syntax. “Hip Young Owl,” her recent retrospective, traced the evolution of this language through sculptures, paintings, etchings, prints, artist books, and mail art spanning more than 50 years. Laxson’s sculptures modeled after mailboxes, lecterns, and other familiar sites of written communication, grounded the exhibition. Dating from the 1990s to the present, the sculptures, which serve as receptacles for Laxson’s mail art and artists books, are crafted out of wood, metal, and canvas covered with paint and text ...see the entire review in the print version of July/August's Sculpture magazine.


Ruth Laxson, Untitled (mail box), mid-1990s. Metal, paint, pencil, and wood (with mail), 54.75 x 13 x 8.5 in.
Boston - Murray Dewart: Boston Sculptors Gallery
by Christine Temin
In Guardian of the Vows, a small, serene bronze with an architectural presence, two tiny towers flank a patterned, rectilinear center. The tops of the towers screw on and off; you can put things in them, provided you roll them up, like your wedding vows, your will, or even a recipe, as long as it is precious. It’s an effective exercise in interactive sculpture. The bronze was featured in Murray Dewart’s recent show “One Bright Morning,” at Boston Sculptors, which included another, this time humorous, interactive piece...see the entire review in the print version of July/August's Sculpture magazine.

Murray Dewart, installation view with Golden Bow and One Bright Morning, 2012.
Garrison, New York - Roy Staab: Garrison Institute
by Amy Lipton
Roy Staab’s recent large-scale, ephem?eral sculpture Wheel of Time, created in May 2012, is made up of hundreds of drilled and pegged, intersecting bamboo poles harvested from the Garrison Institute’s 100-acre woodland. Bamboo is considered an invasive species in New York. By cutting the bamboo to make his work, Staab helped to slow the rapid growth of this beautiful plant, continuing the ecological component of his work; his water-based, tidal sculptures, for instance, often employ unwanted invasives such as phragmite reeds. The Garrison Institute sits along the Hudson River, 60 miles north of New York City...see the entire review in the print version of July/August's Sculpture magazine.

Roy Staab, Wheel of Time, 2012. Bamboo, 18 x 37.25 x 59 ft.
New York - Jim Osman: Lesley Heller Workspace
by Jonathan Goodman
In a very smart show, Jim Osman has taken the cast-offs of his earlier projects in wood and stacked them together to create frontally oriented, open sculptures. The seemingly offhand manner in which he fashions his square or rectangular constructions belies their sophistication. Given as they are to an agreeably rough presentation, it would be easy to see his works as entirely improvisatory; close inspection, however, reveals a sharp formal intelligence at work...see the entire review in the print version of July/August's Sculpture magazine.

Jim Osman, Stack 1, 2012. Gouache, paper, and wood, 9 x 9 x 7.5 in.
New York - Wang Xieda: James Cohan Gallery
by Stephanie Buhmann
Based on the title of Wang Xieda’s first New York solo show, one might expect a focus on figurative or narrative content. Describing a grammatical construction, “Subject Verb Object” seems to imply the depiction of subjects engaged in actions that further involve objects. Wang’s works, however, do not encourage a quick, literal interpretation. Visually (at least to Western eyes), the sculptures of the Shanghai-based artist appear non-objective...see the entire review in the print version of July/August's Sculpture magazine.

Wang Xieda, Sages’ Sayings 026, 2006. Bronze, 37 x 33.5 x 11.75 in.
Queens, New York - “Civic Action”: Noguchi Museum and Socrates Sculpture Park
by Susan Canning
“Civic Action,” though much smaller in scope, celebrated the same spirit of activism and social engagement on view at Documenta XIII in Kassel, Germany, and Manifesta 9 in Genk, Belgium, last summer. Countering the art world’s obsession with commodity and status, all three shows presented an alternative vision of current practice based in collectivity and community...see the entire review in the print version of July/August's Sculpture magazine.

Natalie Jeremijenko, Grid Xing, 2011.
Oshawa, Ontario - Gerald Beaulieu: The Robert McLaughlin Gallery
by Margaret Rodgers
There is a god of maize in the British Museum, an artifact that represents an enduring Central American myth from the Popol Vuh in which corn becomes the main ingredient in the creation of the first people. By 1000 AD, corn had become the staple food throughout the Americas, and it arguably remains so today. Gerald Beaulieu’s recent show offered another vision of this food source...see the entire review in the print version of July/August's Sculpture magazine.

Gerald Beaulieu, installation view with Blue Ribbon Bantam, 2011, plastic syringes and mixed media, 137 cm. high; and Field, 2008, wood, aluminum, and tar, 183 cm. high.
Vancouver - Attila Richard Lukacs: Winsor Gallery
by Daneva Dansby
Known for realist paintings of virile, eroticized figures during the ’80s and ’90s, Attila Richard Lukacs has since moved on to a psychological realm of submerged illusions and maze-like puzzles. Classical and mythological evocations are layered throughout his recent body of work: fountains, urns, and columns merge with impressions of the dead, Valhalla, and the guardian sphinx. The figurative has not been completely delegated to the trash, however; instead, it slips into the works as traces of male nudes, cartoon-like creatures, and opaque transparencies...see the entire review in the print version of July/August's Sculpture magazine.

Attila Richard Lukacs, Marcel Duchamp and Carl Andre Go Out One Night and Get Really Drunk, 2012. Mixed media and paint on wood, 31 x 34 x 95 in.
Buenos Aires - Adriana Varejão: Museo de Arte Latinoamericano de Buenos Aires
by Maria Carolina Baulo
Adriana Varejão is one of Brazil’s most important contemporary artists. “Histories at the Margins,” her recent survey exhibition, featured her entire universe of thoughts and concerns, including paintings, installations, sculptures, photographs, drawings, and objects. Curator Adriano Pedrosa, another Brazilian, emphasized Varejão’s particular viewpoint regarding the expansion and transformation of cultural identity through colonialism, with special attention to Chinese, Portuguese, and Brazilian history, local folklore, spiritual traditions, and gender issues. ...see the entire review in the print version of July/August's Sculpture magazine.

Adriana Varejão, Língua com padrão sinuoso, 1998. Oil on canvas and aluminum, 200 x 170 x 57 cm.
London - Damien Hirst: Tate Modern
by Laura Tansini
When I walked into Tate Modern for Damien Hirst’s retrospective, I was very positive and full of expectations, but I left with contradictory thoughts—not about Hirst’s work per se, but about the value of an anthological exhibition devoted to his work. In his sculptures and paintings, Hirst achieves high formal perfection, a special kind of beauty that represents the most important experience of life—death...see the entire review in the print version of July/August's Sculpture magazine.

Damien Hirst, The Acquired Inability to Escape, 1991. Glass, steel, silicone rubber, Formica, MDF, chair, ashtray, lighter, and cigarettes, 2.13 x 3.05 x 2.13 meters.
 
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