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March 2015
Vol. 34 No. 2

A publication of the
International Sculpture Center
New Orleans, “Guns in the Hands of Artists” - Jonathan Ferrara Gallery
by Joyce Beckenstein
Robert C. Tannen, Specie-Men Gun Parts in a Bottle, 2008.Guns are a passion for many Ameri­cans. They are also weapons of choice in passion crimes, especially in New Orleans, a city with one of the highest per capita homicide rates. “Guns in the Hands of Artists,” a second iteration of Jonathan Ferrara’s heralded 1996 exhibition at Positive Space The Gallery, was timed to coincide with the 2014 ISC conference and the city’s Prospect.3 Biennial. In collaboration with the gun buy-back program of the New Orleans Police Department, Ferrara and artist Brian Borrello once again acquired decommissioned and disassembled guns and distributed their parts to artists as raw materials for new works. The aim, says Ferrara, is “to open a discussion and stimulate thinking about guns in our culture."...see the entire review in the print version of March's Sculpture magazine.

Robert C. Tannen, Specie-Men Gun Parts in a Bottle, 2008.
Birmingham, Alabama: Travis Somerville - beta pictoris gallery
by Lilly Lampe
Travis Somerville, The Love That Forgives, 2014.
Birmingham, past and present, became a site of charged memory in Travis Somerville’s recent exhibition, “American Rhetoric.” His brooding paintings and sculptures feature the piercing gaze of three different groups—glaring, black adults, children who died in the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing, and dour-looking white men in blackface—all highly confrontational images that challenge viewers to acknowledge Birmingham’s all-too-recent past. These faces and other works draw on the emotive power of portraiture, as well as the loaded nature of visual culture, to create a testament to America’s tortured relationship with the past. Graphite and conté portraits on vintage objects dominated the exhibition...see the entire review in the print version of March's Sculpture magazine.

Travis Somerville, The Love That Forgives, 2014.
Los Angeles: Helen Pashgian - Los Angeles County Museum of Art
by John David O’Brien
Helen Pashgian, Untitled, 2013–14.
The darkened rectangular chamber on the entry level of the Art of the Americas Building at LACMA was illuminated by a series of 12 columns running down its center in a straight line. Above each bipartite, gracefully rounded column, two narrow light beams were cast down, turning into a soft glow that emanated out in shifting white to violet-tinged hues. The works featured in “Light Invisible” framed the operating premise of Helen Pashgian’s ongoing research into light and space: the viewer’s perception and his or her active exploration of the work gives it meaning and phenomenological bearing. From the entrance, it was hard to see all of the details in the columns. With the surrounding darkness and the viewing angle...see the entire review in the print version of March's Sculpture magazine.
Helen Pashgian, Untitled, 2013–14.
Delray Beach, Florida: Kyoko Hazama - Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens
by Scott Rothstein
Kyoko Hazama, Secret Passage, 2006. “From a Quiet Place: The Paper Sculptures of Kyoko Hazama” was organized by Susanna Brooks, the Morikami Museum’s curator of Japanese art. The Morikami, which collects and exhibits Japanese art, is thoughtfully designed, grounded by concepts that govern traditional architecture in Japan, but reinterpreted to reflect a contemporary sensibility. This dual orientation is consistent with the ideas that inform Hazama’s work, making the Morikami the perfect venue for her exhibition. Hazama, professionally known before her marriage as Kyoko Okubo, creates diminutive, intimate sculptures that suggest dream-like narratives. “From a Quiet Place,” a kind of mid-career retrospective, brought together sculptures from the past 10 years. Hazama’s small pieces are surprisingly time consuming to fabricate. In this presentation, older sculptures and new efforts...see the entire review in the print version of March's Sculpture magazine.

Kyoko Hazama, Secret Passage, 2006.
Boise, Idaho: Gail Grinnell - Boise Art Museum
by Chris Schnoor
Gail Grinnell, angle of repose, 2014. Seattle artist Gail Grinnell has gained her share of attention over the past several years with thoughtful fabric-based installations and striking wall hangings at prominent venues throughout the Northwest. angle of repose, a site-specific project for the Boise Art Museum’s high-ceilinged, expansive Sculpture Court, enabled her to create her largest work to date, spanning the entire 80-foot-long space. With assistance from her artist son, Sam Wildman, Grinnell fabricated an expansive, lightweight, yet imposing structure made from 600 yards of translucent seamstress interfacing held together by crochet pins. Though the work appears fragile, these ribbons of treated, spun-bound fabric are, in fact, resilient. Dyes made from tea, coffee, and India ink produce an understated palette of browns, grays, and black, interwoven...see the entire review in the print version of March's Sculpture magazine.

Gail Grinnell, angle of repose, 2014.
Boston: Leslie Wilcox - Boston Sculptors Gallery
by Christine Temin
Leslie Wilcox, Violenny, 2014Leslie Wilcox’s signature material has long been metal screening, the ordinary kind used to cover windows in summer. She built her career on quasi-figurative works made out of it, empty dresses and the like, generally suggesting people but not in any literal way. In 2011, however, she began to add wood to her repertory. Wilcox has a friend who owns a small saw mill in Maine, and she worked there, collecting scraps. She rubbed charcoal, graphite, talc, and stain into the wood to emphasize its texture. She added fireplace screening. Some of the pieces were immensely tall and installed so that they listed away from the wall, toward the viewer, in a menacing fashion. Wilcox called her 2011 shLeslie Wilcox’s signature material has long been metal screening, the ordinary kind used to cover windows in summer. She built her career on quasi-figurative works made out of it, empty dresses and the like, generally suggesting people but not in any literal way. In 2011, however, she began to add wood to her repertory. Wilcox has a friend who owns a small saw mill in Maine, and she worked there, collecting scraps. She rubbed charcoal, graphite, talc, and stain into the wood to emphasize its texture. She added fireplace screening. Some of the pieces were immensely tall...see the entire review in the print version of March's Sculpture magazine.

Leslie Wilcox, Violenny, 2014.
Minneapolis: Judy Onofrio - Thomas Barry Fine Arts
by Mason Riddle
Judy Onofrio, installation view of “Full Circle,” 2013.Judy Onofrio’s recent exhibition, “Full Circle,” marked a significant and radical departure in both materials and aesthetics from her flamboyant work of the last three decades. Whereas her earlier figurative sculpture, wall reliefs, and installations—some of grand scale—were theatrical, even operatic assemblages, the “Full Circle” works consist largely of vessel forms that collectively suggest a meditative Gregorian chant in which the visual phrasing is melodious, slowly extending into our consciousness. For these sculptural vessels, created over the last four years, Ono­frio swapped out her signature materials—an amalgam of found stuff such as buttons, beads, glass and ceramic shards, and metal pins, to name a few—for the simplicity and abstract purity of pale-hued animal bones. In place of a cacophony...see the entire review in the print version of March's Sculpture magazine.

Judy Onofrio, installation view of Full Circle, 2013.
Buffalo, New York: Timothy Noble - Burchfield Penney Art Center
by Laura McGough
Timothy Noble, The Semi-Automatic Chalkboard, 2010–13.Timothy Noble’s The Semi-Automatic Chalkboard, a robotically controlled drawing machine, offers a timely consideration of artistic labor. Using open-source software and servo motors to run coded motions, the chalkboard etches out reproductions of sketches created by Charles E. Burchfield in preparation for the oil painting Grain Elevators (1932–38). Working much like an old daisy printer, the automated machine interprets each original drawing by methodically positioning and repositioning itself across the blackboard as it prepares to lay down another stroke. Noble’s chalkboard and one of Burchfield’s original sketches were exhibited side by side, allowing visitors to assess the faithfulness of the manufactured image. If you stuck around long enough, you got an answer to its capabilities— a remarkable similarity...see the entire review in the print version of March's Sculpture magazine.

Timothy Noble, The Semi-Automatic Chalkboard, 2010–13.
New York: Mayumi Sarai - Lori Bookstein Fine Art
by Jonathan Goodman
Mayumi Sarai, Beginning, 2014.Mayumi Sarai is a Japanese-born sculptor who trained at the Nihon University College of Art in Tokyo and at the New York Studio School. Currently, she pursues her career as a carver in Bayonne, New Jersey, and Colchester, New York. Her strongly three-dimensional pieces often take the form of repetitive spheres, fashioned in such a way as to look like a larger gestalt such as a knot or a braid of hair. These forms reiterate her talent for building bigger images from small units or modules of construction. In general, Sarai’s work tends to be relatively neutral in the debate over influence or conscious cultural hybridity; it speaks instead to the interesting interstice between abstraction and figuration, so that viewers...see the entire review in the print version of March's Sculpture magazine.

Mayumi Sarai, Beginning, 2014.
Cincinnati: Celene Hawkins - Taft Museum of Art
by Jane Durrell
Celene Hawkins, Foliate, 2013.A sculptor, turned loose in a gallery filled with paintings, looks at—the frames. Or so it seemed in Celene Hawkins’s thought-provoking exhibition “Landscape Re-framed: Sculp­tures” in which she recorded her responses to the Taft Museum’s fine collection of primarily European works from the 18th and 19th centuries. Hawkins focused on the careful attention to detail and undoubted skill of their makers, and she decided to elaborate on their work in a manner both witty and of an equally high level of craftsmanship. Frames need to surround something, and Hawkins chose to extend the natural references that inspired the frames’ carved flourishes by producing digital prints related to flora and fauna. If these images appear stiff and to some degree...see the entire review in the print version of March's Sculpture magazine.

Celene Hawkins, Foliate, 2013.
Buenos Aires: Claudia Aranovich - Eduardo Sívori Museum
by María Carolina Baulo
 Claudia Aranovich, Caparazones (Shells), 1997. I once defined Claudia Aranovich’s work as a battlefield that consists of materials, message, artist, and spectator, and this description remains relevant. Her recent retrospective at the Eduardo Sívori Museum in Buenos Aires gathered more than 20 large-format sculptures, relief boxes, and luminous objects, as well as a video installation—a formidable sampling of Aranovich’s universe, which swings between oppositions and tensions. The natural and the artificial combine to create richness and diversity; past and present are paired to create memories and essences; and artificial or fabricated materials such as metals, fiberglass, cement, polyester resin, acrylic, paper, and LEDs co-exist with organic seeds, wood, fur, feathers, shells, moss, and stones. This respectful dialogue generates a kind of magic that builds memory...see the entire review in the print version of March's Sculpture magazine.

Claudia Aranovich, Caparazones (Shells), 1997.
New York: “Come Together: Surviving Sandy” - Industry City
by Gae Savannah
G.T. Pellizzi, The Red and the Black, 2013.“Come Together: Surviving Sandy,” in addition to astute two-dimensional invention by the likes of Gary Stephan, Robert Storr, James Siena, and Suzanne Joelson, brimmed with witty sculpture. The raw artscape of mismatched styles made for a funky jungle gym of form, texture, sets, and friends. Tinkering with formalism, the mostly Brooklyn artists were not at a loss for a twist; Chris Larson, for instance, literally sawed through the floor/canvas/pictorial illusion. In a series of installations, curator Phong Bui orchestrated subtle visual parallels among incongruous mediums. In one alcove, a Sheila Pepe sculpture sashayed with a Carrie Moyer painting. Languorous tendrils parlayed with spry swoops, vertical thrusts offset by arcs and swirls. Growing intrinsically out of each medium, stripes hit it off—...see the entire review in the print version of March's Sculpture magazine.

G.T. Pellizzi, The Red and the Black, 2013.

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