International Sculpture Center
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ISDay
#ISDay
March 2017
Vol. 36 No. 2

A publication of the
International Sculpture Center

This selection of shows has been curated by Sculpture magazine editorial staff and includes just a few of the great shows around the world.

Auckland Art Gallery - Auckland, New Zealand: Lee Mingwei
Through March 19, 2017
Lee Mingwei, The Mending
Project Whatever materials Lee uses in his installations, his true medium is people, and their shared experiences. For over a decade, he has played a pivotal role in the expansion of "invitational aesthetics" through his generous people-to-people participatory projects. Many of his openended works, which he labels "social conceptualism," start with a conversation or exchange and take different forms depending on the participants. "Lee Mingwei and His Relations," a retrospective of sorts, is the first exhibition to offer a comprehensive experience of his work in Australasia. Visitors enter a world that conjoins real and imagined, past and present, public and private, each component seeking completion in hands-on activity. Connecting life and art, thought and action, cooperative works such as The Letter Writing Project, Stone Journey, The Mending Project, 100 Days with Lily, and The Sleeping Project (in which lucky ballot winners can spend a night in the gallery) continue to live and grow, offering spaces of change, comfort, repair, and renewal in which trust, intimacy, and self-awareness become tools to produce art.

Web site www.aucklandartgallery.com


Lee Mingwei, The Mending Project.
Burchfield Penney Art Center- Buffalo, New York: Jozef Bajus
Through March 19, 2017
Jozef Bajus, Rusty In Bajus's fiber works, two dimensions seem to suggest three, and pattern breaks away from decoration to open exploratory compositional paths. Such freedom is born of flexibility, both in material and process. Created from cutting and folding, his works are rarely predictable, and their perpetual variety points to an insatiable pursuit of new forms and unexpected meanings. Over the last decade, he has increasingly abandoned pristine fabric and paper in favor of industrial and domestic cast-offs - easily sourced materials whose use results in more than mere conscientiousness. The new works in "Nothing Is Going Away" - all painstakingly and inventively crafted of discards collected from local manufacturers, including felt, paper, wire, and leather, as well as roofing paper salvaged from his roof replacement - challenge us to reconsider the responsibilities of consumption and how we dispose of its unwanted byproducts.

Web site www.burchfieldpenney.org

Jozef Bajus, Rusty.

Hammer Museum- Los Angeles: Jimmie Durham
Through May 7, 2017

Jimmie Durham, Cortez An artist, performer, poet, essayist, and activist, Durham abandoned the narrow strictures of identity politics years ago in favor of a broad-based approach to justice, freedom, and equality - a move reinforced when he left the U.S. in 1987 to live first in Mexico and then in Europe. In his work, as well as in his life, he strives to follow the lead of his "mentor" Italo Calvino and elude all constraints. Rather than making obvious political statements, his work has evolved to embody a political/philosophical stance through its materials, forms, and processes. He once expressed his credo as "against architecture, against narration, against structure." This defiance of the law - any law - characterizes all of his works, from performances with stones as the medium, or tool, of a formless, scattered reality to icon-like sculptures made out of animal parts, recycled PVC pipes decorated with feathers, tortured furniture, and found stones. "At the Center of the World," his first major exhibition in the U.S. since 1995, features nearly 200 works from his expansive practice, including degraded readymades evoking global wastelands; objectpoems adorned with capricious inscriptions, tags, and scars; spurious totemic shrines; and compositions of garbage that just might harbor talismanic power. With strategic wit and skill, these charged assemblages reveal sculpture as a medium tactically and conceptually intertwined with everyday life, while demonstrating a vision of united progressivism, unfractured by competing interests and committed to critical thinking and critique, no matter what the subject.

Web site www.hammer.ucla.edu

Jimmie Durham, Cortez.

HangarBicocca- Milan: Laure Prouvost
Through April 9, 2017
Laure Provost, GDM Prouvost, the winner of the 2013 Turner Prize, says that her work "is about blurring the boundary between fiction and reality. It is about audience - about digging deeply and, maybe, getting lost." A storyteller who seduces viewers with supposedly amateurish material, sound, and imagination, she has moved beyond specially staged films to combine video, everyday objects, sculpture, and painting in holistic scenarios that create encompassing, idiosyncratic realities. Her new installation, GDM - Grand Dad's Visitor Center, continues to blur the line between truth and imagination. The latest installment in an ongoing investigation into the question of whether Prouvost's grandfather was really a conceptual artist whose last work - a hand-dug tunnel from Europe to Africa - remained unfinished because he got lost in it, Visitor Center presents a handmade museum, complete with syncopated videos, large-scale installations, light, and sound, ostensibly constructed by the artist's grandmother after her husband disappeared. Alternating images and written words, moments of contemplation and outbursts of euphoria, this journey through time, fact, and fantasy unfolds through disorienting spaces and paradoxical settings, mirrored walls, tilted rooms, and contorted corridors tracing the twisting permutations of a gripping story.

Web site www.hangarbicocca.org

Laure Prouvost, GDM.
Harvard Art Museums- Cambridge, Massachusetts: Doris Salcedo
Through April 9, 2017
Doris Salcedo, The Materiality of MourningSalcedo has a rare ability to give visual form to traumatic loss and suppressed sorrow: a pair of shoes or ordinary chairs, tables, and beds become alternative memorials impregnated with absence. A sculptor of memory and life, poverty and dignity, she has cracked the floor of Tate Modern's Turbine Hall, walled up a room of the Castello di Rivoli, filled the "human void" left by the destruction of a building in Istanbul, and commemorated the dead with a "mute prayer" in which silence screams with outrage. "The Materiality of Mourning" focuses on her work from the past 15 years - particularly its resonant use of unconventional, intimate materials to achieve a remarkable balance of vigorous fieldwork and poetic reinterpretation, individual tragedy and systemic oppression. From the dead-weight monumentality of concrete-filled armoires and chairs to the fragility of silk, rose petals, and ghostly needle cloaks, these vivid sculptural evocations give strength to weakness and testify to the endurance behind erasure.

Web site www.harvardartmuseums.org

Doris Salcedo, The Materialty of Mourning.
Institute of Modern Art- Brisbane, Australia: Willem de Rooij
Through April 13, 2017
Willem de Rooij, Bouquet XVI Determined by the selection and combination of images in diverse media, including sculpture, film, photography, and text, de Rooij's work revolves around questions of representation and meaning. He analyzes conventions of presentation - in private, public, institutional, and social contexts - and assesses the tension between sociopolitical and autonomous image production. "Entitled," his first solo exhibition in Australia, features three "workgroups" that reflect on the Dutch colonial project and its contemporary incarnations. Sublime textiles trace the global legacy of the Dutch textile industry, while monumental floral bouquets, transitory sculptures in constant need of re-creation, echo the wasteful trafficking behind the Dutch wholesale flower trade..

Web site www.ima.org.au


Willem de Rooij, Bouquet XVI
Metropolitan Museum of Art - Breuer, New York: Marisa Merz
Through May 7, 2017
Marisa Marz, Untitled Marisa Merz once said, "There has never been any division between my life and my work." The sole woman among the men of Arte Povera, she has given its philosophy a decidedly personal, feminist twist, focusing on practices traditionally associated with home and hearth. The knitted copper, aluminum foil, wax paper, and paraffin wax of her sculptures (many intended for display in her house) inject a powerful dose of everyday intimacies into the sterilities of fine art. "The Sky Is a Great Space," her first major retrospective in the U.S., draws together five decades of her gestures and materials while demonstrating her influence on artists as diverse as Alighiero Boetti, Paola Pivi, Rosemarie Trockel, Kara Walker, and Franz West. From early experiments with nontraditional materials to mid-career installations that balance warmth with impressive scale and the enigmatic portrait heads that first appeared after 1975, these almost self-defacing expressions create resonance from little more than elementary action, ordinary materials, and the will to navigate a changing and unpredictable creative universe.

Web site www.metmuseum.org

Marisa Merz, Untitled
Metrotech Commons- Brooklyn, New York: Spencer Finch
Through May 13, 2018
Spencer Finch, Lost Man Creek Operating between the eye and the mind, Finch's work attempts to depict the most fleeting of subjects, from the changing conditions of water in the Hudson River to the color of a sunset in Monument Valley, to the afternoon breeze along Walden Pond and shadows cast by passing clouds. Such investigations into the elusive and ineffable are premised on the notion that insight comes not through logic, but through intuition and receptiveness to the poetry of experience. His new, site-specific installation shifts focus to something much more solid and enduring, though seldom truly seen - trees. Contained within a 4,500-square-foot area, Lost Man Creek re-creates a 790-acre section of Redwood National Park in California, one of the most treasured natural wonders in the U.S., at a 1:1000 scale. Four thousand dawn redwoods, the tallest just four feet high (though they will grow), take the place of ancient giants that rise up to 380 feet from the ground. Within this living miniature, the remote and awe-inspiring come into sharp focus, offering privileged access to the evolution of a forest as it unfolds over the course of the next year.

Web site http://www.publicartfund.org

Spencer Finch, Lost Man Creek.
Middelheim Museum- Antwe



RP:
Roman Signer
Through April 2, 2017
Roman Signer, Projet pour un jardin The A master of the controlled accident, Signer gives a humorous twist to the concept of cause and effect. His "action sculptures" stand the traditional scientific method of experimentation and discovery on its head, taking the self-evidence of logic as an artistic challenge. Following carefully planned and strictly executed and documented procedures, he enacts and records explosions, collisions, and the projection of objects through space - all in the interest of creating emotionally and visually compelling events dictated by time, acceleration, and change. His project for Middelheim (the permanent home of the object-launch sculpture Bidon Bleu) features three new works: Projet pour un jardin, a detail of a maze that illusionistically decapitates everyone who enters, and two "traces" of transformative actions as absurd as life itself, one performed by carpet-bombing drones dropping paintballs and the other by the artist skiing along a flattened, indoor slalom course of sand.

Web site www.middelheimmuseum.be

Roman Signer, Projet pour un jardin.
MIT List Visual Arts Center- Cambridge, Massachusetts: Charlotte Moth
Through April 19, 2017
Charlotte Moth,Travelogue Moth's work may originate in photography, which she uses as a research tool, but then it quickly expands in scope and dimension. Her photographs act as "imagememory," a means to attain her true interest - "the sculptural relationship to experience." She trains her gaze on the architectural spaces in which we live and the objects that surround us. Since 1999, Moth has taken analogue photographs of buildings and interiors encountered while traveling, a collection of images she calls the Travelogue. These photographs serve as source material for many of her installations, variously grouped into slide projections, sculptural wall works, and table assemblages. "Seeing While Moving," her first solo exhibition, features recent installations, sculptures, photographs, and films. Paying close attention to overlooked details like corners and crevices, or the play of shadows, these works transform mundane objects and spaces into strange and magical entities.

Web site http://web.mit.edu/lvac

Charlotte Moth, Travelogue
The Phillips Collection- Washington, DC: Arlene Shechet
Through May 7, 2017
Arlene Shechet, From Here On Now Shechet's off-kilter glazed ceramic sculptures hang in a balance between stable and unstable, teetering between the restraint of intellect and the insistence of instinct. Changing from every perspective and vantage point, these works encourage circumambulation, and their references are just as varied, often drawing on Buddhist iconography for inspiration. Her new exhibition, "From Here On Now," installed in conjunction with works in the Phillips Collection, is both a poetic beckoning and a description of the literal, calling attention to the present and serving as a reminder that the future is an abstraction. A second show, installed at the Frick Collection in New York through April 2, 2017, features a different body of work. During a residency at the renowned Meissen Manufactory, Shechet worked alongside master artisans, learning their techniques, using their tools, and observing longheld traditions. But the ornate porcelain confections on which the company built its reputation held little interest for her; instead, she turned to the humble, utilitarian production forms behind the rarefied finished objects, reconnecting the perfect and precious with the dirt and flame of their genesis. Her "molds of molds" - derived from historic patterns and reconceived in unanticipated combinations - offer a "pretty racy view of porcelain," complete with seams, inventory numbers, and other production warts. Subverting the language of craftsmanship in harness to industry, "Porcelain, No Simple Matter" inverts the traditional hierarchy of artist, artisan, and factory worker - a project that comes to full fruition with Shechet's selection of pieces from the museum's collection of Meissen figurines and tableware, shown in dialogue with 16 of her own works.

Web site phillipscollection.org

Arlene Shechet, From Here On Now
Pulitzer Arts Foundation- St. Louis: Medardo Rosso
Through May 13, 2017
Medardo Rosso, Enfant au seinRosso's pioneering experiments with materials and process - among other accomplishments, he found a way to arrest lost-wax bronze casting in mid-course and preserve the intermediate wax cast - exemplify how sculpture transformed during the late 19th century, with vigorous, sketchy modeling replacing realistic detail and wax elevated to the status of bronze. Though best known for the endless variations that he wrung out of his clay originals, Rosso also brought photography into his consideration of production and reproduction - not only as a means of documentation, but also as a reinterpretive medium capable of capturing the transformative atmospheric effects of light and shadow on three-dimensional form. With nearly 100 works, "Experiments in Light and Form" offers a rare opportunity to follow the iterations of Rosso's serial sculptures across materials. It also features a comprehensive selection of littleknown drawings and collages, as well as the artist's original photographs (some reproducing longlost, life-size plaster works).

Web site http://www.pulitzerarts.org

Medardo Rosso, Enfant au sein
Tang Museum- Saratoga Springs, New York: Janine Antoni and Stephen Petronio
Through March 19, 2017
Janine Antoni and Stephen Petronio, Rope Dance For more than two decades, Antoni has pushed the limits of material possibilities. Whether rendered in chocolate, lard, lipstick, or hemp, her sculptures embody the accumulated traces left behind by her performative processes - gnawing, hair slinging, and eyelash batting. These unorthodox methods allow her to emphasize the meaning inherent in making, a proposition not unrelated to her intense exploration of physicality. Regardless of material or style, Antoni's work always asks what it means to have, and be, a body, particularly a female body. "Entangle," a three-part exhibition, emphasizes her creative collaboration with choreographer Stephen Petronio and movement artist Anna Halprin, blurring the lines between action, video, and installation. In the first installment, Rope Dance, the rope becomes a tool to connect moving bodies and articulate the space between them. Combined with installation, video, and sculpture, the enactment and reenactment of this performance (including a new group experience) connect artist, performer, and viewer, eliding distinct moments of time, action, and interpretation.

Web site https://tang.skidmore.edu

Janine Antoni and Stephen Petronio, Rope Dance
Tate Modern- London: Philippe Parreno
Through April 2, 2017
Philippe Parreno, Anywhen Working across film, video, sculpture, sound, performance, and information technology, Parreno explores the borders between reality and fiction through choreographed spaces that redefine the art experience. Anywhen, his immersive new commission for the Tate's cavernous Turbine Hall, is no exception. Within this universe of interrelated events and parallel realities, acoustics, sound and light, flying objects, and moving images each play a part in a constantly evolving and unpredictable score. Changing throughout each day and over time, Anywhen functions as an orchestrating automaton, a quasiindependent organism/mechanism controlled by design and swayed by chance as the behaviors of microorganisms feed and influence software directives. Whatever its exact ontological status, this entity/intelligence has agency, guiding viewers through a mesmerizing labyrinth of situational sequences that transcend their non-linear disassociation to coalesce into a deep narrative experience.

Web site www.tate.org.uk

Philippe Parreno, Anywhen.

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